US Plans to Strengthen Alternative Fuel Vehicle Infrastructure

US Plans to Strengthen Alternative Fuel Vehicle Infrastructure

Introduction

On Thursday, the White House announced a proposal for $5 billion in funding for new alternative fuel vehicle infrastructure as part of President Donald Trump’s fiscal year 2020 budget plan. While this plan would address some gaps in our nation’s EV charging infrastructure, it is not enough to ensure that we will be able to support even half a million EVs by 2023, let alone the 10 million EVs President Trump has said he’d like to see on U.S. roads by 2021. At this point in time, there are several policies that should be introduced to complement this infrastructure plan in order to accelerate EV deployment and fulfill the goals set forth by President Trump for American drivers–including what he called a “bold vision” for more EVs on U.S. roads

The White House announced a proposal on Thursday to provide $5 billion in funding for new alternative fuel vehicle infrastructure as part of President Donald Trump’s fiscal year 2020 budget plan.

The White House announced a proposal on Thursday to provide $5 billion in funding for new alternative fuel vehicle infrastructure as part of President Donald Trump’s fiscal year 2020 budget plan.

The plan would address some gaps in our nation’s EV charging infrastructure, but it does not include any new funding for research or development of these technologies.

While the plan would provide $5 billion over the next five years to support construction of EV charging stations, hydrogen refueling stations, and natural gas fueling stations at public locations, it would not include any new funding for research or development of these technologies.

While the plan would provide $5 billion over the next five years to support construction of EV charging stations, hydrogen refueling stations, and natural gas fueling stations at public locations, it would not include any new funding for research or development of these technologies.

The Administration has proposed allocating $2 billion in fiscal year 2020 and 2021; $1.5 billion in fiscal year 2022; and $1 billion each year from fiscal 2023 through 2025. This level of investment is significantly lower than what industry leaders say is needed to accelerate EV adoption and bring down costs for consumers who want to purchase electric vehicles (EVs).

While this plan would address some gaps in our nation’s EV charging infrastructure, it is not enough to ensure that we will be able to support even half a million EVs by 2023, let alone the 10 million EVs President Trump has said he’d like to see on U.S. roads by 2021.

While this plan would address some gaps in our nation’s EV charging infrastructure, it is not enough to ensure that we will be able to support even half a million EVs by 2023, let alone the 10 million EVs President Trump has said he’d like to see on U.S. roads by 2021.

The administration’s proposal does not include any additional R&D funding for emerging technologies or direct purchases from automakers. These are both critical elements needed if we want to achieve our goals of electrifying transportation and reducing carbon pollution from cars and trucks by at least 80 percent below 2005 levels by 2050 (the equivalent of taking up to 300 million cars off the road).

At this point in time, there are several policies that should be introduced to complement this infrastructure plan in order to accelerate EV deployment and fulfill the goals set forth by President Trump for American drivers–including what he called a “bold vision” for more EVs on U.S. roads.

At this point in time, there are several policies that should be introduced to complement this infrastructure plan in order to accelerate EV deployment and fulfill the goals set forth by President Trump for American drivers–including what he called a “bold vision” for more EVs on U.S. roads.

  • Tax credits: The federal government currently offers up to $7,500 in tax credits for the purchase of an electric vehicle (EV). These incentives can help make EVs more affordable for consumers and spur sales growth among automakers who offer them. They also incentivize states and localities to invest in their own charging infrastructure so they can encourage drivers who purchase or lease new EVs locally–which will help avoid “range anxiety” as well as reduce greenhouse gas emissions from transportation sector emissions overall.* Direct purchases: While direct purchases don’t offer long-term benefits since they’re only available when buying new vehicles rather than used ones too (and thus aren’t always available), they do prove useful at times because some consumers prefer paying upfront rather than financing over time.* R&D: Research & Development funding is another way governments can help make sure companies have access needed resources like battery technology advancements so we don’t miss out on important developments down road due lack thereof

These policies include extending incentives like the federal tax credit for electric vehicles (EVs), lowering prices for EVs through direct purchases from automakers, and increasing spending on R&D for emerging technologies such as autonomous driving systems and battery technology.

These policies include extending incentives like the federal tax credit for electric vehicles (EVs), lowering prices for EVs through direct purchases from automakers, and increasing spending on R&D for emerging technologies such as autonomous driving systems and battery technology.

The Trump administration’s plan also includes requiring that all new light-duty vehicles sold in 2025 meet minimum average fuel economy standards of 54.5 miles per gallon by model year 2026; this would be an increase from today’s standard of 35 mpg.

Conclusion

The White House’s proposal to invest $5 billion over five years in new EV infrastructure is a welcome step toward improving the U.S. charging network and accelerating EV deployment in America. However, it is not enough to meet President Trump’s goal of having 10 million EVs on U.S. roads by 2021–nor does it address all of the other barriers that are preventing these vehicles from becoming mainstream. In order for this plan to succeed and reach its full potential, policymakers should consider additional policies such as extending federal tax credits for purchases of EVs (which expire at the end of 2019), lowering prices for EVs through direct purchases from automakers (like Tesla), or increasing spending on research and development (R&D) programs related

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